Psychodynamic psychotherapy is an instrument that facilitates self-knowledge and expansion of the field of thought, as well as personal transformation and the search for a meaning of life.

That therapeutic approach settles the belief that our behaviour is determined by unconscious mental processes. These processes are, for the most part, established during childhood.
The methods of adaptation to the world and to others, developed while we were children, come from a relationship of total dependency to our parents or to a keen absence of emotional ties. Consequently, they can no longer be effective when we become adults. For that reason, the childhood and the relationships with parents and other people of crucial importance for the emotional development are, many times, the starting point of the therapeutic meeting. It is the connection with the psychotherapist that allows the person to become aware of his or her maladjusted defence mechanisms. Although they had their purpose in the past, these mechanisms, once relevant and useful, have become obsolete to the point of hampering the adaptability to a distinctive present reality. The person, by realising that has at his or her disposal a great variety of new resources and options, becomes more able to solve problems based on a reinforced confidence in their current maturity and independence. That new perception takes you to a new level of self-knowledge and a greater awareness towards a new relationship with yourself and the others. Your well-being will reflect on a greater quality of life, freedom and flexibility to face the challenges of the future.
Psychodynamic psychology favours the client/therapist dynamics in a safe environment, full of total acceptance and empathy.
Psychotherapy being a concentrated effort to create meaning where there is anxiety, confusion or emptiness, trust in your therapist is fundamental, for it is the dynamics of that client/therapist relationship that will determine success in the therapeutic process.